Intranet
Intranet > Policies & Procedures > Policies > 4. Student Welfare > Anaphylaxis
    Redirected from Bayside At Work/Policies & Procedures/Policies/4. Student Welfare/Anaphylaxis

     

    Intranet

    Quality Controlled

    Document No. & Title

    402 Anaphylaxis
    Version 1.4 Author Deputy Principal Owner Principal
    Approval Date 15/03/2013 Last Review 05/2018 Next Review 02/2019
    VRQA Minimum Standard/s Student Welfare: Care, Safety and Welfare of Students

     

    Table of Contents

     

    Purpose

    Calls to love one another and care for the vulnerable echo throughout the Bible. As such, Bayside Christian College is committed to the care of all members of the school community including the safety and wellbeing of students who are at risk of anaphylaxis. The College maintains that the care of these students is a whole-of-school community responsibility, especially as anaphylaxis is potentially life threatening. The purpose of this policy is to provide, as far as practicable, a safe and supportive environment in which students at risk of anaphylaxis can participate equally in all aspects of their schooling. 

    Scope

    This policy relates to all students enrolled at the College, diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis, their parents/carers and to all staff, volunteers and visiting specialists. It applies while the student is under the care or supervision of school staff for both in-school and out-of-school settings including camps and excursions.
     

    Policy Statement

    Bayside Christian College is committed to providing a safe environment for our students. As a College we comply with the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 and Ministerial Order No. 706 by ensuring that:

    • The Principal is primarily responsible for ensuring that an individual anaphylaxis management plan is developed for any student diagnosed with a medical condition that relates to allergy and the potential for anaphylactic reaction.
    • An individual anaphylaxis management plan (that includes an individual ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis) is developed in consultation with the student’s parents/carers and medical practitioner for every student diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis.

    • the College develops prevention strategies to minimise risk of anaphylaxis

    • College First Aid kits contain an adrenaline auto-injector for use in an emergency

    • An anaphylaxis communication plan is developed, implemented and reviewed regularly to raise staff, student and school community awareness about severe allergies and school policies.

    • Staff receive the necessary training and updates in recognising and responding appropriately to an anaphylactic reaction, including competently administering an adrenaline auto-injector (such as EpiPen®/Anapen®).

    • The College completes an anaphylaxis risk management checklist annually.

     

    Parents/carers of a student at risk of anaphylaxis are responsible for informing the school, either at enrolment or diagnosis (whichever is earlier), of the student’s allergies and whether the student has been diagnosed as being at risk of anaphylaxis.
     

    Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plans

    The College First Aid Officer is responsible for ensuring that an Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plan (IAMP) is developed and reviewed, in consultation with the student’s parents/carers, for any enrolled student who has been diagnosed by a medical practitioner as being at risk of anaphylaxis.

    The IAMP must be in place prior to the student’s first day at Bayside Christian College. In the event that an IAMP is not in place, the principal will develop an interim Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plan in consultation with the parents/carers of any affected student.

    The IAMP will include the following:

    • Type of allergy or allergies based on diagnosis from medical practitioner
    • Strategies to minimise risk of exposure to allergens
    • Name of person/s responsible for implementing strategies
    • Storage location of student’s medication
    • Student’s emergency contact details
    • An Emergency Procedures Plan (EPP) (or Action Plan for Anaphylaxis), provided by parents/carers that:
      • Sets out the emergency procedures to be taken in the event of an allergic reaction
      • Is signed by a medical practitioner who was treating the child on the date the practitioner signs the emergency procedures plan
      • Includes an up-to-date photograph of the student.

    See ASCIA (Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy) Action Plan for Anaphylaxis template www.allergy.org.au  

    • School IAMP reviews will occur, in consultation with student’s parents/carers;
      • Annually;
      • If the student’s medical condition changes; AND
      • Immediately after a student has an anaphylactic reaction at school
    • Parents/carers of students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis are responsible for;
      • Providing the EPP (Action Plan for Anaphylaxis), on enrolment and prior to the student’s first day at the College
      • Informing the school if their child’s medical condition changes and providing an updated EPP, if needed.
      • Providing an up-to-date photo for the IAMP
      • Providing an appropriate adrenaline autoinjector that is current (ie the device has not expired) for their child

    When students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis participate in off-campus College activities (e.g. excursions, camps) a copy of their IAMP and any medication will be taken on the activity and stored in the College’s Off-Campus First Aid Kit.
     

    Communication Plan

    The Principal is responsible for ensuring a communication plan is developed, implemented and reviewed. The plan will:

    • Raise the school community’s awareness about severe allergies and College policies
    • Be communicated to all staff, students and parents
    • Detail the role of volunteers and casual relief staff in responding to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in their care
    • Outline the steps to be taken to respond to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in all on- and off-site school environments e.g. school buildings/grounds, school camps, school sports day etc.

    The Principal is responsible for ensuring that all school staff are briefed twice yearly (the first one at the beginning of the year) by a staff member who has up-to-date anaphylaxis management training.
     

    Staff Training and Emergency Response

    The Principal shall ensure a sufficient number of staff present have up-to-date training in accordance with Ministerial Order No. 706.

    The school’s first aid procedures, emergency procedures and a student's IAMP will be followed in responding to an anaphylactic reaction.

     

    Risk Management

    The College OH&S Committee shall ensure that the Annual Anaphylaxis Risk Management Checklist and Annual Anaphylaxis Risk Assessment are completed and tabled at an OH&S Committee meeting, for discussion and action, during Term 1 of each academic year.
     

    Procedural Steps

    Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plans

     

    Students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis are identified during the College’s enrolment process by the College Registrar on the Application for Enrolment form and College Family Details form.

    College Registrar informs First Aid Officer who adds student name to College Register of Students at Risk of Anaphylaxis.

    On enrolment and prior to the student’s first day of school, the student’s parents provide an Emergency Procedures Plan and current photo of the student (use Action Plan for Anaphylaxis template) to the College First Aid Officer.

    Important Note: Where an existing student receives a diagnosis of being at risk of anaphylaxis i.e. they are already enrolled at the school, and weren’t diagnosed when they first commenced, parents must inform the College’s First Aid Officer immediately and provide an Emergency Procedures Plan and current photo as soon as possible. The student’s name will be added to the College Register of Students at Risk of Anaphylaxis.

    The College First Aid Officer will ensure the Register of Students at Risk of Anaphlaxis is maintained. The College First Aid Officer will review this list at the beginning of each term and, in addition to verifyng that all enrolled students at risk of anaphylaxis are included, will remove any students should they have left the College.

    The EPP and student photo, together with the Bayside CC Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plan Template, are used by the First Aid Officer to prepare the student’s IAMP in consultation with the student’s parents/carers.

    The First Aid Officer displays the Student’s IAMP in the First Aid room, Staffroom and Student’s classroom and provides a copy to all relevant staff.

    The First Aid Officer prepares College First Aid Kits for all off-campus activities and ensures, where necessary, that copies of student IAMP’s and their medication are appropriately stored in the kit.

    The First Aid Officer works with parents to ensure external third-party providers e.g. TAFE staff, have a copy of a student’s EPP and necessary medication etc. where students undertake unsupervised, off-campus activities related to school.

    The College’s First Aid Officer reviews the IAMP in consultation with the student’s parents as per the policy statement above to ensure:

    • Student’s emergency contact details are up-to-date
    • Device-specific EPP matches the supplied adrenaline auto-injector
    • The adrenaline auto-injector is not out-of-date, or cloudy (checked at the beginning of each term)
    • Adrenaline auto-injector is stored correctly, in an easily accessible place (refer Bayside Christian College’s Medication Management Policy)

     

    Implementing the Communication Plan

    Staff will be communicated with using the twice yearly briefing session, as well as regular updates on students at risk of Anaphylaxis at Staff Meetings. The content of the twice yearly briefing session is outlined below under Staff Training and Emergency Response.

    Casual relief teachers are informed of the identities of students at risk of anaphylaxis and the steps required for prevention and emergency response by the College’s First Aid Officer and are provided with a folder of supporting documentation. In the event that a CRT does not have the required anaphylaxis management training the First Aid Officer will ensure that a teacher in an adjoining classroom has access to the student’s EPP and where relevant, adrenaline auto-injector in case of emergency.

    The Canteen Manager and canteen staff are informed of the identities of students at risk of anaphylaxis and the steps required for prevention and emergency response by the College’s First Aid Officer. The Canteen Manager is also provided with a folder of supporting documentation. These staff undertake anaphylaxis management training.

    Volunteers involved in excursions and camps are briefed before activities by the supervising teacher/s to the indentities of students at risk of anaphlaxis and only assist under the direct supervision of staff with the required anaphlaxis management training. 

    The College will seek to raise community awareness about anaphylaxis in the school community through providing information to parents at enrolment, briefing sessions at Information Nights, and articles in the College Newsletter.

    Please also see Implementation of Policy (below).
     

    Staff Training and Emergency Response

    The Principal ensures that a sufficient number of staff present have up to date training in an anaphylaxis management course (including updates/refreshers), and, where possible, prior to the student’s first day of school. The Principal will also ensure that all school staff are undertake anaphylaxis training and are briefed at least twice a year by the School Anaphylaxis Supervisors. These Supervisors will have currency in the Course in Verifyng the Correct Use of Autoinjector Devices and the ASCIA Anaphylaxis e-Training for Victorian Schools. The School Anaphylaxis Supervisors will be two most senior First Aid Officers in the College.

     

    The twice yearly briefings will include information on:

    • the school’s legal requirements as outlined in Ministerial Order 706
    • pictures of the students at risk of anaphylaxis, their allergens, year levels and risk management plans that are in place
    • causes, signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis
    • relevant anaphylaxis training
    • ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and how to administer an EpiPen®
    • the location of adreline autoinjectors whether provided by parents or by the College for general use 
    • the College’s First Aid Policy and Emergency Response Procedures
    • how to access on-going support and training.

    All completed staff training is logged in the College’s Register of Staff First Aid Training by the First Aid Officer based on information provided by the First Aid Trainer.

    The principal will ensure that interim plans are in place and parents are consulted with in the event that training or a briefing has not occurred as required. Should it be necessary that an interim plan be put into place the principal will ensure that training and a briefing for the relevant staff occurs as soon as practicable. 

     

    In the event that a student at risk of anaphylaxis has a reaction, during class or other supervised College activity (e.g. excursion, sports day, camp - refer Off Campus Activities Policy), the supervising staff member acts in accordance with the College's first aid and emergency response procedures and follows the student’s EPP/Action Plan including, if relevant, administering an adrenaline auto-injector as per instructions.

    In the event, that a student at risk of anaphylaxis has a reaction during recess or lunchtime breaks, the staff member on yard duty acts in accordance with the College's first aid and emergency response procedures and will use their College walkie-talkie to contact the First Aid Officer who will bring the student’s EPP and administer any medication as per instructions immediately. 


    Risk Management

    The College First Aid Officer and College OH&S Representative use the Annual Anaphylaxis Risk Management Checklist and Annual Anaphylaxis Risk Assessment templates to assess risks and recommend action to the OH&S Committee to minimise/eliminate identified risks.

    This risk management checklist and risk assessment are completed annually, in Term 1, and documents tabled at the next OH&S Committee Meeting

    The College Business Manager/OH&S Committee Chairperson signs off on all adopted/actioned recommendations and records this in the OH&S Committee Meeting minutes

    The Annual Anaphylaxis Risk Management Checklist and Risk Assessment are stored with OH&S Committee Minutes and other records

    The Business Manager/OH&S Committee Chairperson informs College Executive of any new/revised control measures

    College Executive communicates any new/revised control measures to College staff via twice yearly staff briefings/staff meetings and records this communication in staff meeting minutes

     

    Emergency Autoinjectors (for General Use)

    The College will ensure that First Aid kits contain an adrenaline auto-injector for use in an emergency. These will be understood as back-up or unassigned Adrenaline Autoinjectors and they are additional to the prescribed Adrenaline Autoinjectors for individuals provided by parents/carers. These Adrenaline Autoinjectors are not a substitute for individuals at high risk of anaphylaxis having their own prescribed auto-injectors.

    Emergency (General Use) Adrenaline Autoinjectors are used when:

    • a student’s prescribed Autoinjector does not work, is misplaced, out of date or has already been used;

    • a student is having a suspected first time anaphylactic reaction and does not have a medical diagnosis for anaphylaxis ; or

    • when instructed by a medical officer after calling 000.

    The number and type of Adrenaline Autoinjectors are purchased considering:

    • the number of students enrolled who have been diagnosed as being at risk of anaphylaxis; the accessibility of Adrenaline Autoinjectors that have been provided by parents/carers;

    • the availability of a sufficient supply of Adrenaline Auto-injectors for general use in specified locations at the school (e.g. school yard, at excursions, camps and special events);

    • that Adrenaline Autoinjectors have a limited life, usually expire within 12-18 months, and will need to be replaced either at the time of use or expiry, whichever is first;

    • that currently the only Adrenaline Autoinjector available in Australia is EpiPen®;

    • that children under 20 kilograms are prescribed a smaller dosage of adrenaline, through an EpiPen® Jr; and Adrenaline Autoinjectors are designed so that anyone can use them in an emergency.

    Even when there are no students enrolled with a diagnosed risk of anaphylaxis, the Principal should consider purchasing an autoinjector for general use for students who may experience their first anaphylactic reaction while at the school.

     

    Storage

    All Adrenaline Autoinjectors and medication must be stored according to a student’s ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and checked regularly to ensure that they have not expired, become discoloured or sediment is visible.

    Adrenaline Autoinjectors and other medication must be stored in various locations which are easily accessible to staff but not accessible to students. A copy of the student’s ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis must also be stored with their medical kit.

    The following procedures will be followed for storage of Adrenaline Autoinjectors:

    • Adrenaline Autoinjectors for individual students, or for general use, are stored correctly and able to be accessed quickly;

    • Adrenaline Autoinjectors are stored in an unlocked, easily accessible place away from direct light and heat but not in a refrigerator or freezer;

    • each Adrenaline Autoinjector is clearly labelled with the student's name and stored with a copy of the student's ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis;

    • an Adrenaline Autoinjector for general use will be clearly labelled and distinguishable from those for students at risk of anaphylaxis and stored with a general ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis (orange); and

    • Adrenaline Autoinjector trainer devices (which do not contain adrenaline or a needle) are not stored in the same location due to the risk of confusion.

    Whenever Adrenaline Autoinjectors are taken and returned to/from their usual location, such as for camps and excursions, this must be clearly recorded. Bayside Christian College maintains Adrenaline Autoinjectors and other relevant medication in the following location/s:

    • First Aid room

    • With the child at their classroom in a clearly marked container/ bag

    All staff should be aware of these locations.

     

    Communication of Policy

    The College will communicate this policy, including the need for parents to keep the school informed of any serious conditions their child may be suffering, to the College community through:

    • Enrolment process
    • Parent Handbook
    • Information Sessions
    • Inclusion on the College Intranet
    • College newsletter
       

    Implementation of Policy

    The policy and procedure will be implemented throughout the College through:

    • Training in ASCIA anaphylaxis e-training for all staff teaching/supervising students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis.
    • Twice yearly staff briefing sessions including hands-on practice coordinated by the two School Anaphylaxis Supervisors using an adrenaline auto-injecting device (which does not contain adrenaline).
    • Time in staff meetings, to discuss, practise and review school’s strategies for students at risk of anaphylaxis.
    • Providing information to the College community about resources and support for managing allergies and anaphylaxis via the College newsletter and other correspondence.
    • Raising student awareness about severe allergies and the importance of their role in fostering a school environment that is safe and supportive for their peers (during Homeroom time and when preparing for camps/excursions).
    • Encouraging students to wash their hands after handling food and ensuring tables and surfaces are wiped down regularly.
    • Planning documents include assessing risks and developing risk minimisation strategies and management strategies for the student.
       

    Definitions

    Term Definition

    Adrenaline auto-injector

    Any autoinjector device that contains adrenaline and is used for anaphylactic reactions, such as EpiPen®, EpiPen®Jr, Anapen® or Anapen®Jr.

    Allergen

    A substance that can cause an allergic reaction.

    Certain foods and insect stings are the most common causes of anaphylaxis. Eight foods cause 95 per cent of food allergic reactions in Australia and can be common causes of anaphylaxis:

    • peanuts

    • tree nuts (i.e. hazelnuts, cashews, almonds, walnuts, pistachios, macadamias, brazilnuts, pecans, chestnuts and pine nuts)

    • eggs

    • cow’s milk

    • wheat

    • soy

    • fish and shellfish (e.g. oysters, lobster, clams, mussel, shrimp, crab and prawns)

    • sesame seeds.

    Other common allergens include some insect stings, particularly bee stings but also wasp and jumper jack ant stings, tick bites, some medications (e.g. antibiotics and anaesthetic drugs) and latex.

    Allergy

    An immune system response to something that the body has identified as an allergen.

    Anaphylaxis

    A severe, rapidly progressive allergic reaction that is potentially life threatening.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Signs and Symptoms

    Mild to Moderate Allergic Reaction can include:

    • swelling of the lips, face and eyes
    • hives or welts
    • tingling mouth
    • abdominal pain and/or vomiting (these are signs of a severe allergic reaction to insects)
       

    Anaphylaxis (Severe Allergic Reaction) can include:

    • difficult/noisy breathing
    • swelling of tongue
    • swelling/tightness in throat
    • difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice
    • wheeze or persistent cough
    • persistent dizziness or collapse
    • pale and floppy (young children)
       

    Supporting Documents

    Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, Anaphylaxis Guidelines – A resource for managing severe allergies in Victorian government schools see http://www.education.vic.gov.au/Documents/school/principals/health/Anaphylaxis_Guidelines_FINAL.pdf

     

    Related Policies

    First Aid
    Medication Management
    Off Campus Activities